What is an introductory prepositional phrase

what is an introductory prepositional phrase

Using Introductory Phrases Correctly

Nov 02,  · An introductory prepositional phrase is a prepositional phrase that comes at the beginning of a sentence. It does not contain the subject of the sentence, so . In an introductory prepositional phrase, the sentence starts with a preposition and a few words that follow it. The prepositional phrase adds information to the main clause, often about a location or timing.

General Education. In grammar, a "prepositional phrase" refers to a preposition, its object, and any modifiers. A prepositional phrase is a part of a sentence that consists of one preposition and the object it affects.

The object of a prepositional phrase can be either a noun, gerund, or clause. It consists of a preposition "on" and a noun "time".

In this example, the prepositional phrase is "with that beautiful woman. As shown in this example, prepositional phrases can govern more than one word—they can govern any words that modify or describe the object of the preposition, too. The preposition in this prepositional phrase is "before.

Remember that prepositional phrases can govern nouns, gerunds, or clauses. The first type of prepositional phrase modifies a noun. In that way, this type of prepositional phrase acts as an adjective and is therefore known as an adjectival phrase.

Here, the prepositional phrase "behind my house" acts adjectivally because it modifies the noun "Whole Foods. In both of these examples, the prepositional phrases give more information about the nouns to enhance our understanding. Just as prepositional phrases can act as adjectives that modify nouns, they can also act as adverbs that modify verbs.

The prepositional phrase "with excitement" acts adverbially because it provides more information about how Jane is cheering. In this sentence, the prepositional phrase "behind his brother" gives us more information about exactly where Mark looked. The prepositional phrase "during the commercials" acts as a noun and is in fact the subject of the sentence.

What's the prepositional phrase definition? A prepositional phrase is a part of a sentence consisting of a preposition and the word it governs. Prepositions in prepositional phrases can govern nouns, gerunds, or clauses. Trying to brush up on your grammar to prepare for your AP English exam?

We've got tons of resources for you! Start by reviewing our AP English exam guide and then check out the complete list of practice tests and books you should read for the essay portion of the test. Looking for information about writing? Take a look at our guides on literary elementssonnetsand similes vs metaphors.

Wondering about the role grammar plays on the SAT? Hayley Milliman is a former teacher turned writer who blogs about education, history, and technology. When she was a teacher, Hayley's students regularly scored in the 99th percentile thanks to her passion for making topics digestible and accessible. Our new student and parent forum, at ExpertHub. See how other students and parents are navigating high school, college, and the college admissions process.

Ask questions; get answers. How to Get a Perfectby a Perfect Scorer. Score on SAT Math. Score on SAT Reading. Score on SAT Writing. What ACT target score should you be aiming for? How to Get a Perfect 4. How to Write an Amazing College Essay. A Comprehensive Guide. Choose Your Test. What Is a Prepositional Phrase? Prepositional Phrase Examples: Modifying Nouns There are a number of different types of prepositional phrases. Here are some examples of prepositional phrases acting as adjectives: That puppy at the park is so happy.

I like to go grocery shopping at the Whole Foods behind my house. Prepositional Phrase Examples: Modifying Verbs Just as prepositional what is the most popular beer in germany can act as adjectives that modify nouns, they can also act as adverbs that modify verbs.

Prepositional Phrases Acting as Adjectives The girl in the middle is the best dancer. The grocery store across town has a great produce selection. The park near the lake has an off-leash dog area. The restaurant behind my house is loud. The neighbors to my right have a lot of what are brake lines made out of. Prepositional Phrases Acting as Adverbs She went to the store. My dad took his boat to the lake.

My sister clapped for her team. Prepositional Phrases Acting as Nouns Behind the school is a park. After the movie is the perfect time to get dinner. During the flight is a good time to catch up on work. There are three main types of prepositional phrases: Those that act as nouns Those that act as adverbs Those that act as adjectives Looking at prepositional phrase examples can help you keep each of them straight!

Have friends who also need help with test prep? Share this article! Hayley Milliman. About the Author. Search the How to remove dark wood stain from wood Search. Find Out How. Get the latest articles and test prep tips! Looking for Graduate School Test Prep?

How to Use Each Type of Introductory Phrase

A prepositional phrase is a part of a sentence consisting of a preposition and the word it governs. Prepositions in prepositional phrases can govern nouns, gerunds, or clauses. There are three main types of prepositional phrases: Those that act as nouns.

Introductory phrases set the stage for the rest of your sentence, giving the reader valuable information about what is happening and why. There are several different types of introductory phrases, and there are specific rules for using these correctly.

Learn when and where to use a comma after an introductory phrase and how to make your writing stand out with just the right words. Before you learn how to correctly use and punctuate an introductory phrase, you need to have a clear understanding of what one is and why you would use it in a sentence. Simply put, an introductory phrase is a group of words that comes before the main clause in a sentence.

It helps the reader understand more about the main clause. An introductory phrase is not a complete clause; it does not have a subject and a verb of its own. Galloping quickly , the horse reached the other side of the pasture in less than a minute. Because the horse was galloping quickly , he reached the other side of the pasture in less than a minute. Each type serves a distinct purpose within the sentence. In an introductory prepositional phrase , the sentence starts with a preposition and a few words that follow it.

The prepositional phrase adds information to the main clause, often about a location or timing. To use it properly, you need to use a comma after the introductory prepositional phrase to set it apart from the rest of the sentence if the phrase is longer than four words. You can see the proper punctuation in these examples:.

If an introductory prepositional phrase is made up of fewer than five words and does not require a pause, the comma is optional.

It is correct to use a comma and also correct to leave it out, as you can see in the example below:. Using an introductory infinitive phrase also provides information to the reader, often about why something is happening. These phrases also provide location and other helpful information. It may also include a direct object of the verb. You should always use a comma after an introductory infinitive phrase, as you can see in these examples:. A participial phrase is another form of verb phrase.

Like an infinitive phrase, it may have a direct object. It sets the stage for the main clause, allowing the reader to understand the context of what is happening. An absolute phrase also adds information to the main clause, providing context for the reader to interpret the rest of the sentence. This type of introductory phrase offers a little more detail about the way in which something is happening or the reason for which it is happening. An introductory absolute phrase requires a comma to set it off from the main clause, as you can see in these examples:.

An appositive phrase offers an alternative description of a noun in the sentence. You can use this as an introductory phrase, giving the reader more information about the subject of the sentence or another noun. When you start with an appositive phrase, you often need to use a comma after it. If the phrase is a nice addition to the sentence but is not necessary for clarity, you should use a comma:. However, if the introductory appositive phrase is necessary to the sentence, you should not use a comma.

Consider whether the phrase adds important clarifying information about the subject. These examples can clear up any confusion:. This is because you pause after the introductory phrase when you say the sentence aloud.

However, like all aspects of the English language, there are a few exceptions. Learn more about comma usage rules to become a confident writer. Introductory phrase horse galloping quickly. What Is an Introductory Phrase? You can see how this works in this introductory phrase example: Galloping quickly , the horse reached the other side of the pasture in less than a minute.

In contrast, this introductory clause example includes both a subject and a verb: Because the horse was galloping quickly , he reached the other side of the pasture in less than a minute. Introductory Prepositional Phrases Examples and Usage In an introductory prepositional phrase , the sentence starts with a preposition and a few words that follow it.

You can see the proper punctuation in these examples: After the severe spring thunderstorm , the sky turned gold. In the very beginning of the story , a boy meets a stray dog. Opening the door to my friend , I discovered that she was not alone. Introductory Infinitive Phrase Examples and Usage Using an introductory infinitive phrase also provides information to the reader, often about why something is happening. You should always use a comma after an introductory infinitive phrase, as you can see in these examples: To get to the store , turn left at Oak Street.

To write a great essay , start with a good outline. Introductory Participial Phrase Examples and Usage A participial phrase is another form of verb phrase. Like an infinitive phrase, always set this introductory phrase off with a comma: Having finished his lunch , Sam went back to working on his art project.

Running quickly , the boy caught up with the dog. Opening her eyes , she saw early morning light peeking through the curtains. Pouring the water on the plant , Carol admired the flowers just beginning to open. Introductory Absolute Phrase Examples and Usage An absolute phrase also adds information to the main clause, providing context for the reader to interpret the rest of the sentence. An introductory absolute phrase requires a comma to set it off from the main clause, as you can see in these examples: Completely oblivious to the rain , the children continued to play outside.

Though the flowers were fading, their perfume remained strong. Voice wavering , the child begged to be allowed to stay up late. Their arms around each other , they bowed their heads and walked on against the wind. Introductory Appositive Phrase Examples and Usage An appositive phrase offers an alternative description of a noun in the sentence.

If the phrase is a nice addition to the sentence but is not necessary for clarity, you should use a comma: An insightful reader , Aaron offered a fantastic interpretation of the text the class was studying. A fine mouser , my cat caught every rodent that dared to come in the house.

A jaw-dropping display of light and sound , the fireworks amazed all who were lucky enough to see them. These examples can clear up any confusion: The award-winning author Judy Blume came to speak at our school.

The math teacher Mr. Cody was the one to administer the standardized test. The engineering manager Mr. Carrington led the meeting. The English class Introduction to Romantic Poetry was my favorite. Post a comment.



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